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Former POW: ‘Never Give Up’
ALTUS AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. – U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Bryan Creager, 97th Air Mobility Wing command chief, leads a remembrance run while holding the prisoners of war and missing in action flag during the third annual POW/MIA Remembrance Ceremony at the Wings of Freedom Park Sept. 19. On August 10, 1990, the 101st Congress passed U.S. Public Law 101-355, which recognized the POW/MIA flag and designated it as the symbol of the United States’ concern and commitment to resolving the fates of Americans still prisoner, missing and unaccounted for. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jesse Lopez/Released)
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Former POW: 'Never Give Up'

Posted 9/20/2013   Updated 9/20/2013 Email story   Print story

    


by Senior Airman Jesse Lopez
97th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs


9/20/2013 - ALTUS AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. -  -- Altus AFB honored National POW/MIA Recognition Day with the third annual Remembrance Ceremony Sept. 19 at the Wings of Freedom park. This day is observed on the third Friday of September each year to remember those who were prisoners of war and those who are missing in action, as well as their families.

The Warrior 5/6 Council, comprised of non-commissioned officers from the base, organized the event consisting of a firing party, playing of "Taps," a speech from a former POW Marine Sgt. Jack Warner and a twenty-four hour remembrance relay run.

"I think this is essential to upholding military traditions and honoring those that served in the past," said Tech. Sgt. Matthew Noble, Vice President of the Warrior 5/6 Council. "If you look at someone like Warner and the things he went through, he spent three and a half years in captivity. Service members should take every opportunity to recognize the service and sacrifice given to this country by individuals such as Warner."

Warner's account as a POW was among the events in remembrance of those who were imprisoned while serving in conflicts and those who remain missing. He visited the base and shared his experiences with Airman from Altus and provided a message for young service members.

"Don't ever give up," said Warner. "A lot of guys gave up and their life spans weren't very long."

His visit concluded with a base tour and lunch at the base track where the twenty-four hour remembrance relay run was held, using a baton engraved with Warner's name.

"The support from the base for my family and I has been wonderful," said Warner.

On August 10, 1990, the 101st Congress passed U.S. Public Law 101-355, which recognized the POW/MIA flag and designated it as the symbol of the United States' concern and commitment to resolving as the fates of Americans still prisoner, missing and unaccounted for.



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