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Capt. Hunter Barnhill, 37th Flying Training Squadron instructor pilot, trains on his road bike May 15, 2018, on Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi. Barnhill will bike anywhere from a few miles to over 15 miles in one training session. As a member of the Air Force Wounded Warrior program he is preparing for the 2018 Warrior Games June 1-9 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Keith Holcomb) Instructor pilot shares experience in AFW2 program before competing in Warrior Games
The end of an Easter egg hunt in 2017 brought Capt. Hunter Barnhill, 37th Flying Training Squadron instructor pilot, down to the ground as his body was trapped in a seizure.
0 5/24
2018
Sheppard Air Force Base Military, civilian Airmen use resiliency training to overcome struggles
Sheppard AFB military and civilian Airmen share their stories of adversity and how resiliency training helped them overcome their experiences.
0 5/07
2018
Capt. Hunter Barnhill, a 37th Flying Training Squadron instructor pilot, sits with his wife, Crystal, and their 3-year-old son, Nowlan, Jan 28, 2018, on Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi. Many friends and families from Columbus AFB gave artwork and memorabilia from the 37th FTS to show their support for their family through his brain surgery and recovery process. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Keith Holcomb) Pilot battles brain cancer, recovery with faith
Walking into his backyard after an Easter egg hunt Capt. Hunter Barnhill’s hand formed a fist, holding itself with incredible and uncontrollable strength, he attempted to spread his fingers, but instead consciously fell to the ground before his friends and his own 2-year-old son, Nolan, looked onto him confused.
0 2/02
2018
AFMS Homepage Mens Health Jun 2016 (AF Graphic) AF Men’s Health Month promotes better health, better care
According to the National Institutes of Health, compared to women, men are more likely to smoke, drink, make unhealthy choices and delay regular checkups and medical care. While mental health issues are more common in women, men are much less likely to seek care. Many of the major health risks faced by men can be prevented or treated with early
0 5/27
2016
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