News Search

CES Airmen remove runway rubber, ensure aircrew safety

97th Civil Engineer Squadron removes runway rubber.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Chase Gaines, the 97th Civil Engineer Squadron Dirt Boyz non-commissioned officer in charge, prepares to get inside the vehicle that is used to clean the runways during a rubber removal on September 12, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. If there is too much rubber buildup on the runway, landings and take-offs can become slick and unsafe for aircrew. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Breanna Klemm)

97th Civil Engineer Squadron removes runway rubber.

Two vehicles from the 97th Civil Engineer Squadron Dirt Boyz drive to remove rubber off the runway on September 12, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. The rubber removal process takes an average of 12 total hours to complete with each end of the runway taking six hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Breanna Klemm)

97th Civil Engineer Squadron removes runway rubber.

From left, U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Ignatius Mazeko and Airman 1st Class Michael Rivera,97th Civil Engineer Squadron Dirt Boyz, fill a truck up with water during the rubber removal process on September 12, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. Water is then poured on the runway and is scrubbed for three hours or until all the excess chemicals, debris and rubber are gone. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Breanna Klemm)

97th Civil Engineer Squadron removes runway rubber.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Chase Gaines, the 97th Civil Engineer Squadron Dirt Boyz non-commissioned officer in charge, scrubs the runway to remove the rubber left from aircraft tires on September 12, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. The rubber removal process is conducted approximately every three to six months. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Breanna Klemm)

97th Civil Engineer Squadron removes runway rubber.

From left, U.S. Air Force ReShean Tipton and Airman 1st Class Logan Stephens, 97th Civil Engineer Squadron Dirt Boyz, pours Avion50 into a water truck during the rubber removal process on September 12, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. During the rubber removal process the runway is first coated with a layer of Avion50, an eco-friendly solution used to dissolve the rubber on the runway. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Breanna Klemm)

97th Civil Engineer Squadron removes runway rubber.

A runway is pictured before a rubber removal September 12, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base (AFB), Oklahoma. Altus AFB is the only installation in Air Education and Training Command where Airmen conduct rubber removal themselves. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Breanna Klemm)

97th Civil Engineer Squadron removes runway rubber.

A runway is pictured after a rubber removal process on September 12, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. Since the process is done manually, the 97th Civil Engineer Squadron saves approximately $107,000 each removal and can safely continue the mission of training exceptional mobility Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Breanna Klemm)

ALTUS AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. --

The 97th Civil Engineer Squadron Dirt Boyz removed rubber buildup on the runway left by aircraft tires during takeoffs and landings September 12, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. Altus AFB is the only installation in Air Education and Training Command where Airmen conduct rubber removal themselves.

The process is required every three to six months for safety reasons. If there is too much rubber buildup on the runway, landings and take-offs can become slick. The rubber removal process takes an average of 12 hours total to complete with each end of the runway taking six hours.During the rubber removal process, the runway is first coated with a layer of Avion50, an eco-friendly solution used to dissolve the rubber buildup on the runway. The 97th CES Dirt Boyz then use a plastic and metal brush attached to a vehicle to scrub the solution off the concrete. Water is then poured on the runway and is scrubbed for three hours or until all the excess solution, debris and rubber are gone.

Since it is done manually, the 97th CES saves approximately $107,000 each removal and can safely continue the mission of training exceptional mobility Airmen.

Dress and Appearance
Awards and Decorations
Air Force Promotions
Fitness Program
AF Demographics