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  • Earth Day 2020: Time to think about mother Earth

    The idea for a national day to focus on the environment came to Earth Day founder Gaylord Nelson, a U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, after witnessing the ravages of the 1969 massive oil spill in Santa Barbara, Calif. More than 20 million Americans demonstrated for a healthy, sustainable environment in massive coast-to-coast rallies.
  • SANDS students visit Europe, gain new perspectives

    Students from Air University’s School of Advanced Nuclear Deterrence Studies met with European allies last month to gain new perspectives and alternative views on how different parts of the world define nuclear deterrence.
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Results:
Tag: Germany
Clear
  • Earth Day 2020: Time to think about mother Earth

    The idea for a national day to focus on the environment came to Earth Day founder Gaylord Nelson, a U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, after witnessing the ravages of the 1969 massive oil spill in Santa Barbara, Calif. More than 20 million Americans demonstrated for a healthy, sustainable environment in massive coast-to-coast rallies.
  • SANDS students visit Europe, gain new perspectives

    Students from Air University’s School of Advanced Nuclear Deterrence Studies met with European allies last month to gain new perspectives and alternative views on how different parts of the world define nuclear deterrence.
  • The Great Escape: setting the record straight

    A memorial ceremony took place to commemorate the “Great Escape” of World War II near Ramstein AB, Germany on July 1, 2017. The memorial honored Royal Air Force Squadron Leader Roger Bushell and French Air Force 2nd Lt. Bernard Scheidhauer, the two escapees executed near Ramstein in March 1944.
  • Surviving the Holocaust: Former Soldier, AF civilian tells his story

    Fear. In one word, Bob Behr used fear to describe how he and most of the Jewish community in Germany lived their lives from 1933 until the mid-1940s. In that time, Behr would suffer persecution, work in forced labor, be arrested and sent to the Theresienstadt “camp-ghetto” with his family, and ultimately, survive the Holocaust. Following his liberation in 1945, Behr would eventually find his way to the U.S., where he enlisted in the Army, and nearly five years later was discharged and worked for the Air Force as a civil servant in the intelligence field for 35-plus years.
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