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Altus partners with FBI to host training aimed at readiness

U.S Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joseph Teresi, NCO in charge of Military Working Dogs assigned to 97th Security Forces Squadron, guides his dog to search concrete blocks, Mar. 29, 2019, at Altus Air Force Base, Okla. Highly sensitive peroxide-based explosives are now routinely being used by terrorists, so canine training with these chemicals provides readiness in these situations.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Dallin Wrye)

U.S Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joseph Teresi, NCO in charge of Military Working Dogs assigned to 97th Security Forces Squadron, guides his dog to search concrete blocks, Mar. 29, 2019, at Altus Air Force Base, Okla. Highly sensitive peroxide-based explosives are now routinely being used by terrorists, so canine training with these chemicals provides readiness in these situations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Dallin Wrye)

Law enforcement officers of Oklahoma socialize during a break in the bomb technician briefings, Mar. 29, 2019, at Altus Air Force Base, Okla. The training was designed to provide first responders with updated information on current threats.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Dallin Wrye)

Law enforcement officers of Oklahoma socialize during a break in the bomb technician briefings, Mar. 29, 2019, at Altus Air Force Base, Okla. The training was designed to provide first responders with updated information on current threats. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Dallin Wrye)

Harry, Military Working Dog assigned to 97th Security Forces Squadron, takes a break after training, Mar. 29, 2019, at Altus Air Force Base, Okla. Military working dogs are originally trained at Lackland AFB, Texas before they are given to units around the world.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Dallin Wrye)

Harry, Military Working Dog assigned to 97th Security Forces Squadron, takes a break after training, Mar. 29, 2019, at Altus Air Force Base, Okla. Military working dogs are originally trained at Lackland AFB, Texas before they are given to units around the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Dallin Wrye)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Kenneth Holt, dog handler assigned to 97th Security Forces Squadron, rewards his dog after training, Mar. 29, 2019, at Altus Air Force Base, Okla. Harry is the newest canine at the 97th SFS.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Dallin Wrye)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Kenneth Holt, dog handler assigned to 97th Security Forces Squadron, rewards his dog after training, Mar. 29, 2019, at Altus Air Force Base, Okla. Harry is the newest canine at the 97th SFS. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Dallin Wrye)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Russell Ferguson, dog handler assigned to 97th Security Forces Squadron, holds back his canine from a simulated aggressor, Mar. 29, 2019, at Altus Air Force Base, Okla. Military working dogs are trained daily to learn to encounter threats and dangerous situations.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Dallin Wrye)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Russell Ferguson, dog handler assigned to 97th Security Forces Squadron, holds back his canine from a simulated aggressor, Mar. 29, 2019, at Altus Air Force Base, Okla. Military working dogs are trained daily to learn to encounter threats and dangerous situations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Dallin Wrye)

ALTUS AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. --

The 97th Air Mobility Wing hosted the FBI master bomb technician training here March 29, 2019. Law enforcement officers from across Oklahoma traveled to Altus AFB for the opportunity. Barry Black, FBI Master Bomb Technician, said the training was about providing readiness to officers everywhere. The briefings consisted of information on domestic and international improvised explosive device trends, tactics and ideology.

“Briefings included maritime and unmanned aerial platform threats as well as IED case studies and officer safety issues,” said Black. “The training was designed to provide first responders with updated information about the current threats posed by terrorists and provide a venue to strengthen interagency operability.”

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joseph Teresi, NCO in charge of Military Working Dogs assigned to the 97th Security Forces Squadron, said the training not only helped readiness but it also helped everyone get together and learn each other’s capabilities.

“By coming together, it reminds us of who we have to rely upon locally as a part of our team,” said Teresi. “Often times, we get together at a chaotic scene where we develop plans to safeguard our communities. This training gave us an opportunity to sit down and understand each other’s capabilities and what we bring to the table.”

After the briefings, dog handlers from the 97th SFS and from Fort Sill Army Post, Okla. attended canine training on peroxide-based explosives. These types of explosives are highly sensitive and are becoming more common. Black said the FBI makes the material available to the military so the dogs can learn to detect it.

“Explosive detection canine imprinting is available each quarter through the FBI,” said Black. “Intelligence briefs, table top exercises, field training exercises and specialized counter-IED training are routinely provided by the FBI and can be tailored to the target audience domestically and partner nations internationally.”

Airmen at the 97th AMW continue to train for every situation providing a more lethal and ready force.

“This training will directly impact the way we prepare for tomorrow’s fight,” said Teresi. “We will integrate the learned tactics and procedures into our daily training events and continue to forge ourselves as mission-ready Military Working Dog teams. Our mission is simple - when the call comes, we will be trained and ready to counter the threats posed to U.S. Forces and our communities.” 

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