HomeNewsArticle Display

News Search

Running to Remember

The Prisoner of War and Missing in Action baton is displayed on a rock before the beginning of the race at Mathis Fitness Center track on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 13, 2020. The baton was made from a fire ladder rung and held a POW-MIA coin in each end. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Staff Sgt. Seraiah Wolf)

The Prisoner of War and Missing in Action baton is displayed on a rock before the beginning of the race at Mathis Fitness Center track on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 13, 2020. The baton was made from a fire ladder rung and held a POW-MIA coin in each end. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Staff Sgt. Seraiah Wolf)

U.S. Air Force Col. James Finlayson, 17th Training Wing vice commander, delivers opening remarks at the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action 24 hour remembrance run on the Mathis Fitness Center track on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 13, 2020. Finlayson spoke about the courage that men and women in POW-MIA positions must have and how to learn from them. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Seraiah Wolf)

U.S. Air Force Col. James Finlayson, 17th Training Wing vice commander, delivers opening remarks at the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action 24 hour remembrance run on the Mathis Fitness Center track on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 13, 2020. Finlayson spoke about the courage that men and women in POW-MIA positions must have and how to learn from them. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Seraiah Wolf)

U.S. Air Force Col. James Finlayson, 17th Training Wing vice commander, runs the final stretch of the Mathis Fitness Center track during the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action 24 hour remembrance run on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 13, 2020. After each participant finished their running time they handed off the baton to the next member. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Seraiah Wolf)

U.S. Air Force Col. James Finlayson, 17th Training Wing vice commander, runs the final stretch of the Mathis Fitness Center track during the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action 24 hour remembrance run on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 13, 2020. After each participant finished their running time they handed off the baton to the next member. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Seraiah Wolf)

U.S. Air Force Col. James Finlayson, 17th Training Wing vice commander, begins the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action 24 hour remembrance run by making the first lap around the track with the baton. During the run the baton never stopped moving. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dominique Parham)

U.S. Air Force Col. James Finlayson, 17th Training Wing vice commander, begins the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action 24 hour remembrance run by making the first lap around the track with the baton. During the run the baton never stopped moving. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dominique Parham)

U.S. Army Soldiers ruck around the track during the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action 24 hour remembrance run at the Mathis Fitness Center track on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 14, 2020. One Soldier ran for 20 straight hours on his own during the event. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ethan Sherwood)

U.S. Army Soldiers ruck around the track during the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action 24 hour remembrance run at the Mathis Fitness Center track on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 14, 2020. One Soldier ran for 20 straight hours on his own during the event. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ethan Sherwood)

A 312th Training Squadron student bows his head during a moment of silence at the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action 24 hour remembrance run on the Mathis Fitness Center track on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 14, 2020. Over 1,500 American heroes are still missing and unaccounted for from the Vietnam War. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ethan Sherwood)

A 312th Training Squadron student bows his head during a moment of silence at the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action 24 hour remembrance run on the Mathis Fitness Center track on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 14, 2020. Over 1,500 American heroes are still missing and unaccounted for from the Vietnam War. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ethan Sherwood)

A participant runs with the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action baton during the POW-MIA 24 hour remembrance run at the Mathis Fitness Center track on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 14, 2020. Participants ran laps around the track for 24 straight hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ethan Sherwood)

A participant runs with the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action baton during the POW-MIA 24 hour remembrance run at the Mathis Fitness Center track on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 14, 2020. Participants ran laps around the track for 24 straight hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ethan Sherwood)

GOODFELLOW AIR FORCE BASE, Texas --

Goodfellow members held the annual Prisoner of War and Missing in Action 24 hour remembrance run at the Mathis Fitness Center track on Nov. 13, here.

This run is held every year in remembrance of the nearly 82,000 Americans who are still missing from different conflicts beginning with WWII until the present.

Col. James Finlayson, 17th Training Wing vice commander, delivered opening remarks before running the first lap of the race.

“The remembrance run/walk is a tribute to the sacrifice and forced resolve of the men and women who have not returned home to us,” said Finlayson. “We recognize them for their courage and determination they have shown in the face of unspeakable hardships.”

Members could sign up for 15 minute running slots to show their support.

“I just wanted to take a chance to remember those who came before us,” said 1st Lt. Michael White, 17th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron physician assistant. “I just came out for a little during lunch to help support.”

Throughout the run, members carried a baton with a rolled print out of 3,726 Texans that are POW/MIA from various conflicts since WWII. The 312th Training Squadron made the baton from a fire ladder rung and caped each end with a piece of wood that holds a POW/MIA coin. During the 24 hour run, the baton remained in constant motion.

“These characteristics make this baton a uniquely Goodfellow tribute to those missing in action,” said Finlayson. “May those who we run for serve as an example to us and what brings us together and what strengthens us even in these difficult times that are facing our nation.”

Dress and Appearance
Awards and Decorations
Air Force Promotions
Fitness Program
AF Demographics